BLAKE CARTER | GERMS


SCRAPS | DEVIL’S IN
2012.November.12, 2:59pm
Filed under: 2012.NOVEMBER, SCRAPS | Tags: , , , , , ,

Killer bees attack (column 12, row 2).

Above and below are details from 255 Pedestrians (and Stroller), completed late last night. As in most of my recent works, I’m playing around with ways to make marks using Sakura Pigma Graphic and Sakura Pigma Micron pens. I’ve also been trying to push myself to draw more women. For some reason Freudian or otherwise, I tend to enmasculate females when I’m drawing. I figure it’s something to do with mirrors.  Regardless, I don’t often hear complaints that there are too many women around.

Shrunken-head Pablo (column 11, row 11).

Stretch pants (column 5, row 14).

This is one of my favorites from this piece. No pedestrian really, just scribbly swirls.

Some of these lines cut into the paper, so up close this almost looks like bas relief (column 6, row 8).

I wanted suggestion to play a big part in this drawing. Does this woman have feet? (column 1, row 2)

Eventually I’ll get an image of the final piece up on my gallery of finished works, for now it’s on my Facebook page.



SCRAPS | WOMAN IN RED

In my previous post I noted how differently pieces from my Pedestrian Series look in real life and in photographs. Here are more close-ups, this time from 255 Pedestrians, a piece I finished yesterday. Watch the figure above as you scroll down. Starting with her, I zoom out to show the surrounding eight figures, then the sixteen figures surrounding those, and etc, up to the finished work.



SCRAPS | DETAILS, DETAILS

The above detail is about 2.5 inches across. One thing my ongoing show in Laguna has taught me is that my current works look much, much better in real life than they do in photographs or on a monitor. The most basic problem is that the plane of our eyes’ focus changes constantly, and this is impossible to achieve with a camera. Even line art on the slickest vellum looks much better to the eye than it ever could in print. In a previous post I noted how happy I was that a friend and collector chose to hang my work at the end of the entrance hallway of his house; the pride of place was flattering, but I also know that people entering his door will see my piece from a distance first, and then their focus will change as they approach the wall on which it’s hung.

Below are five works I’ve completed since sending pieces for my current show to the framer. I’ve been experimenting around with my Pedestrian Series:

Now here’s what I love most about this series. Each figure is composed of rough, abstract lines and forms that together add up to the images you see from a distance. In a photograph, these forms are only visible in a close-up view:

In these details, you can see how the ink is sometimes jammed down into the porous watercolor paper, while at other times the pen has been roughly slid along the surface, and still others, the ink sits atop the paper in a layer:

I’ve been playing around with introducing color into these works. Below is a detail of a piece that includes marks using Prismacolor Premier markers, but I’m not sure if I like the way the ink soaks into the paper so easily. You can tell the difference between the thick orange lines (Prismacolor) and the fine red lines (my usual Sakura pens) flaring out from the figures:

Here’s another experiment. For this piece I coated the paper with a layer of black acrylic paint, and then scraped the white forms out with an X-acto blade:

Another view of the same piece, showing how the individual images look up close and further away. Only with the naked eye can you see both views of the same image at the same time.



SHOWTIME | PLAYING HANGMAN

My show at Laguna Inkspot Gallery comprises nineteen pieces in ten different sizes. The distance between the floor and the center of each piece is 57 inches, so the top of a 30 inch piece is 72 inches above the floor (57 + (30/2)), easy right? But then the wires attaching each of the works are at different heights, even for two works of the same size (one wire might hold a work at 7.25 inches from the top of the frame, another at 7.5 inches from the top). Height of nail equals 1/2 height of artwork minus distance from top of frame to wire plus 57 inches. Then they need to be centered on the wall. When this show’s all finished and done I’ll post a list of what I would do if I were starting over, no big mistakes but could have made things easier for myself.



SHOWTIME | FRAME SHOP

The last picture above features two of my works and Larry, the owner and sole employee of the frame shop up the street. This morning I dropped off the last few pieces for my show next month, so I had a chance to see what Larry’s done. The man is incredible. The frames and mats are exactly what I wanted — sleek and modern to highlight the grid-like composition and contrast with the rough, expressive line in my drawings. Even better, Larry’s giving me a bulk rate that’s so good that I can afford to custom frame 19 pieces for the show.